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leftbehindandsour:

You look so tired and unhappy
Bring down the government
They don’t, they don’t speak for us
I’ll take a quiet life
A handshake of carbon monoxide

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I broke someone’s heart tonight. This is the first time I have to do this and it is not fun at all.

Tags: life
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sinidentidades:

1. There is no “lax enforcement” on the U.S./Mexico border. There are over 20,000 Border Patrol Agents; that number was as low as 9,800 in 2001. We have walls and a system of large, centralized detention centers that didn’t exist just 15 years ago. Now more than 350,000 people spend some time in an immigrant detention center every year. The U.S. spends more on immigration enforcement than all other enforcement activities of the federal government combined, including the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. The growing numbers of people in detention—young people as well as families and adults— is being used as a pretext by the anti-immigrant lobby in Washington, including the Tea Party and the Border Patrol itself, for demanding increases in the budget for enforcement. The Obama administration has given way before to this pressure.

2. The migration of children and families didn’t just start recently. It has been going on for a long time although the numbers have recently surged. The tide of migration from Central America goes back to wars that the U.S. promoted in the 1980s, in which we armed the forces, governments or contras, who were most opposed to progressive social change. Many hundreds of thousands of Salvadorans came to the U.S. during the late 1970s and 80s, to say nothing of Guatemalans and Nicaraguans. Whole families migrated, but so did parts of families, leaving loved ones behind with the hope that some day they’d be reunited.

3. The recent increase in the numbers of child migrants is not just a response to gang violence, although this is the most-cited cause in U.S. media coverage. Migration is as much or more a consequence of the increasing economic crisis for rural people in Central America and Mexico, as well as the failure of those economic structures to produce jobs. People are leaving because they can’t survive where they are.

4. The failure of Central America’s economies is largely due to the North American and Central American Free Trade Agreements and their accompanying economic changes, including privatization of businesses, the displacement of communities by foreign mining projects and cuts in the social budget. The treaties allowed huge U.S. corporations to dump corn and other agricultural products in Mexico and Central America, forcing rural families off their lands when they could not compete.

5. When governments or people have resisted NAFTA and CAFTA, the United States has threatened reprisal. Right-wing Congressman Tom Tancredo (R-Colo.) put forward a measure to cut off the flow of remittances (money sent back to Salvadoran families from family members working in the U.S.) if the leftwing party, the FMLN, won the 2004 presidential election. His bill did not pass but the U.S. Embassy in San Salvador admitted that it had intervened. In 2009, the Honduran army overthrew President Manuel Zelaya after he raised the minimum wage, gave subsidies to small farmers, cut interest rates and instituted free education. The Obama administration gave a de facto approval to the coup regime that followed. If social and political change had taken place in Honduras, we would see far fewer Hondurans trying to come to the U.S.

6.  Gang violence in Central America has a U.S. origin. Over the past two decades, young people from Central America have arrived in L.A. and big U.S. cities, where many were recruited into gangs, a story eloquently told by photographer Donna DeCesare in the recent book Unsettled/Desasociego: Children in the World of Gangs. The Maratrucha Salvadoreña gang, which today’s newspaper stories hold responsible for the violence driving people from El Salvador, was organized in Los Angeles, not in Central America. U.S. law enforcement and immigration authorities responded to the rise of gang activity here with a huge program of deportations. The U.S. has been deporting approximately 400,000 people per year since 2009.

7.  Moreover, U.S. foreign policy in Central America has actively led to the growth of gang violence there. In El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras, U.S. law enforcement assistance pressured local law enforcement to adopt a mano dura, or hardline, approach to gang members, leading to the incarceration of many young people deported from the U.S. almost as soon as they arrived. Prisons became schools for gang recruitment. Even in El Salvador—where the leftwing FMLN government at least has a commitment to a policy of jobs and economic development to take young people off the street and to provide an alternative to migration—conservative police and military forces continue to support heavy enforcement. In Guatemala and Honduras, the U.S. is supporting very rightwing governments that only use a harsh enforcement approach. Hypocritically, while punishing deportees and condemning migration, these two governments actually use the migration of people to the U.S. as a source of remittances to keep their economies afloat.

8. Kids looking for families here are looking for those who were already displaced by war and economic crisis. The separation of families is a cause of much of the current migration of young people. Young people fleeing the violence are reacting to the consequences of policies for which the U.S. government is largely responsible, in the only way open to them.

Two and three years ago we were hearing from the Pew Hispanic Trust and other sources that migration had “leveled off.” No one is bothering to claim that anymore. Migration hasn’t stopped because the forces causing it are more powerful than ever.

More enforcement will not deal with the causes of the migration from Central America. In fact, the deportation of more people back to their countries of origin will increase joblessness and economic desperation—the main factors causing people to leave. Violence, which feeds on that desperation, will increase as well.

President Obama proposed raising the enforcement budget by $3.7 billion to address the recent influx of unaccompanied Latin American minors. He called for suspending a law passed in 2008 that requires minors to be transferred out of detention to centers where they can locate family members to care for them, and to instead deport them more rapidly. Both ideas cause more pain, violate basic rights and moral principles, and fail completely to stop the conditions that have led to mass migration.

The New York TimesCarl Hulse wrote that the law transferring minors out of detention centers “is at the root of the potentially calamitous flow of unaccompanied minors to the nation’s southern border.” This report and others like it not only ignore history and paint a false picture of the reasons for migration but also provide the rationale for increased enforcement.

Similarly, New Jersey Democratic Senator Bob Menendez has declared “we must attack this problem from a foreign policy perspective, a humanitarian perspective, a criminal perspective, immigration perspective, and a national security perspective.” He calls for more funding for the U.S. military’s Southern Command and the State Department’s Central American Security Initiative, among other recommendations. Giving millions of dollars to some of the most violent and rightwing militaries in the Western hemisphere, however, is a step back towards the military intervention policy that set the wave of migration into motion to begin with.

Instead, we need to help families reunite, treat immigrants with respect, and change the policies the U.S. has implemented in Central America, Mexico and elsewhere that have led to the conditions where massive migration is needed for survival. The two most effective measures would be ending the administration’s mass detention and deportation program and ending economic and military policies that are causing such desperation in the countries these children and families are fleeing.

(via sinidentidades)

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soulbindinglove:

vegan-vulcan:

marysmorsten:

oftaggrivated:

kavaeric:

je-suis-cocopuff:

micdotcom:

Your bottled water habit is sucking California dry

If you’re reading this, chances are very high that your home has at least one — and maybe more! — magic appliance that produces clean water suitable for drinking. That’s one reason to avoid paying for bottled water.

Another reason? There’s a good chance the water you’re buying at the supermarket was bottled in California, a state currently enduring a severe drought.

Turn on the tap instead Follow micdotcom

(Images via MotherJones)

EVERYONE PLEASE AT LEAST TAKE A QUICK SECOND TO LOOK AT THIS

BECAUSE IT IS EFFECTING THE EXACT AREA I LIVE IN

Lots of people believe bottled water is safer and cleaner than tap water, when in reality there’s no evidence proving such a thing.

http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/stories/spacescience/water-bottle-pollution/

http://edition.cnn.com/2013/11/19/health/upwave-bottled-water/

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/study-bottled-water-safer-tap-water/story?id=87558

Penn & Teller’s Bullshit!: Bottled Water segment, gives a very good and thorough summary of the bottled water culture https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MHx6BX3HZJc

You want better water? Buy a Zero filter. SRSLY. Stop buying bottled if possible. You need water with you? Get reusable acrylic or glass water bottles (wrapped in a silicon sleeve) and fill it up from your filter pitcher. SAVE MONEY, SAVE MY STATE

stop drinking bottled water, mother fuckers

Agree!

But may I remind everyone that if you are really concerned about water conservation, a great place to start is not eating animals and animal products.

Thank you for this information. It’s time to switch up my habits.

(via thinksquad)

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voguedissent:

wocinsolidarity:

socialismartnature:

Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.
That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.

sickening 

also if you look at the list of countries
basically all the second and third world countries voted “yes” and european/”western”/first world countries voted “abstain”
jfc
they really don’t have two shits to give about brown bodies and colonized peoples

voguedissent:

wocinsolidarity:

socialismartnature:

Breaking via ABC News: UN Human Rights Council votes to open inquiry into alleged war crimes in Gaza; U.S. is the ONLY “no” vote.

That’s because the U.S. is a direct accomplice to every war crime that Israel commits.

sickening 

also if you look at the list of countries

basically all the second and third world countries voted “yes” and european/”western”/first world countries voted “abstain”

jfc

they really don’t have two shits to give about brown bodies and colonized peoples

(Source: twitter.com, via ficklefalsity)

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descentintotyranny:

Fast-paced events like this are when Twitter suddenly becomes the best source of news. For continuing updates on what’s happening in Gaza tonight, follow the #Gaza or #GazaUnderAttack hashtags, along with the twitter users above. Pray for Palestine.

(via la-xingada)

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la-xingada:

momo33me:

Parents and family of Mohamad Abu Khdair (15 years) who was kidnapped today at dawn by a herd of terrorist Zionist colonists, tortured and burned to death .2 July 2014

Rest in Power